According to job search giant Monster, reading not only increases your knowledge and vocabulary, but also improves your writing and analytical skills. These benefits apply to all kinds of reading material, not just business books. You can mine for nuggets of wisdom and wit in memoirs, history books, or even fiction. “One reason fiction works so well in the workplace is that characters, plots, and settings in foreign locales help anchor difficult discussions,” according to a 2020 article in Harvard Business Review. “The narrative allows participants to work through sensitive and nuanced issues in an open and honest manner.” We asked our team for their picks of books that inspire creativity. Before you browse your favorite shopping site or pop into your neighborhood indie bookstore, take a look at these recommendations. Your summer reading can serve double duty as poolside entertainment and marketing inspiration. Confessions of an Advertising Man by David Ogilvy Recommended for: Anyone who creates content or looking for creative inspiration “Ogilvy is known as the Father of Advertising, and I wanted to pay homage to where part of my field has come from. Even today, I still find his advice relevant, including: ‘If you want to be interesting, be interested,’ ‘Never use jargon words; they're hallmarks of a pretentious ass,’ and ‘Never stop testing, and your advertising will never stop improving.’” -Tori Lawhorn, Sr. Copy & Content Specialist The Pragmatic Programmer by Andrew Hunt & David Thomas Recommended for: Developers, software engineers, and their managers “A classic book from 1999 that focuses less on actual code and how to be a programmer that is a true professional of their craft. Many of the lessons and topics covered should be known to experienced programmers, but this will enforce many of the touchstones a programmer should take to heart: Don't Repeat Yourself (DRY) code, think critically, know your tools, do not leave broken windows unrepaired, automate all the things, and program and refactor deliberately.” -AC Rosalee, Developer Tacky: Love Letters to the Worst Culture We Have to Offer by Rax King Recommended for: Marketers who want to make emotional connections to customers, and anyone who lived through the 90s and early 2000s “Each essay is punctuated with wit and humor that makes this one hard to put down. King offers writers like myself a framework for taking something as mundane as shopping malls or Bath & Body Works lotion and turning it into an insightful, relatable, and entertaining read.” -Chris Bailey, Sr. Copy & Content Specialist Blue-Eyed Devil by Lisa Kleypas Recommended for: Hopeless romantics “I loved that this book combined the cliche hopeless romantic storyline with real-life trauma events — I would go from butterflies in my stomach to crying all within 10 pages! BRILLIANT!” -Mariah Murray, Healthcare Marketing Specialist Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir Recommended for: Fans of tech, sci-fi, space travel, or language “I love how the characters systematically solve problems and find a way to innovate together. It is a good reminder that even with differences in language, culture, etc., we create beautiful work when we collaborate.” -Jeremy Albert, Animation Producer House of Gucci by Sara Gay Forden Recommended for: A fan of fashion, true crime, or pop culture “It's a good, easy read that will keep your attention. Perfect for a day by the pool with a cold drink in your hand.” -Alli Eisenhut, Marketing Director Nine Lies About Work: A Freethinking Leader’s Guide to the Real World by Marcus Buckingham & Ashley Goodall Recommended for: Anyone interested in organizational performance “This book helped me reimagine what it means to be a good leader by debunking common corporate ‘best practice’ myths and providing an alternate path to achieving maximum effectiveness. Highly recommend.” -Ashly Myers, Vice President, Creative and Strategy Looking for more marketing inspiration? Check out some of our work.

Agency Life

What to Read for Marketing Inspiration: Summer Reading 2022

Blog Author

Kristina Meek
June 6, 2022

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According to job search giant Monster, reading not only increases your knowledge and vocabulary, but also improves your writing and analytical skills.

These benefits apply to all kinds of reading material, not just business books. You can mine for nuggets of wisdom and wit in memoirs, history books, or even fiction. “One reason fiction works so well in the workplace is that characters, plots, and settings in foreign locales help anchor difficult discussions,” according to a 2020 article in Harvard Business Review. “The narrative allows participants to work through sensitive and nuanced issues in an open and honest manner.”

We asked our team for their picks of books that inspire creativity. Before you browse your favorite shopping site or pop into your neighborhood indie bookstore, take a look at these recommendations. Your summer reading can serve double duty as poolside entertainment and marketing inspiration.

Confessions of an Advertising Man by David Ogilvy

Recommended for: Anyone who creates content or looking for creative inspiration

“Ogilvy is known as the Father of Advertising, and I wanted to pay homage to where part of my field has come from. Even today, I still find his advice relevant, including: ‘If you want to be interesting, be interested,’ ‘Never use jargon words; they're hallmarks of a pretentious ass,’ and ‘Never stop testing, and your advertising will never stop improving.’”
-Tori Lawhorn, Sr. Copy & Content Specialist

The Pragmatic Programmer by Andrew Hunt & David Thomas

Recommended for: Developers, software engineers, and their managers

“A classic book from 1999 that focuses less on actual code and how to be a programmer that is a true professional of their craft. Many of the lessons and topics covered should be known to experienced programmers, but this will enforce many of the touchstones a programmer should take to heart: Don't Repeat Yourself (DRY) code, think critically, know your tools, do not leave broken windows unrepaired, automate all the things, and program and refactor deliberately.”
-AC Rosalee, Developer

Tacky: Love Letters to the Worst Culture We Have to Offer by Rax King

Recommended for: Marketers who want to make emotional connections to customers, and anyone who lived through the 90s and early 2000s

“Each essay is punctuated with wit and humor that makes this one hard to put down. King offers writers like myself a framework for taking something as mundane as shopping malls or Bath & Body Works lotion and turning it into an insightful, relatable, and entertaining read.”
-Chris Bailey, Sr. Copy & Content Specialist

Blue-Eyed Devil by Lisa Kleypas

Recommended for: Hopeless romantics

“I loved that this book combined the cliche hopeless romantic storyline with real-life trauma events — I would go from butterflies in my stomach to crying all within 10 pages! BRILLIANT!”
-Mariah Murray, Healthcare Marketing Specialist

Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir

Recommended for: Fans of tech, sci-fi, space travel, or language

“I love how the characters systematically solve problems and find a way to innovate together. It is a good reminder that even with differences in language, culture, etc., we create beautiful work when we collaborate.”
-Jeremy Albert, Animation Producer

House of Gucci by Sara Gay Forden

Recommended for: A fan of fashion, true crime, or pop culture

“It's a good, easy read that will keep your attention. Perfect for a day by the pool with a cold drink in your hand.”
-Alli Eisenhut, Marketing Director

Nine Lies About Work: A Freethinking Leader’s Guide to the Real World by Marcus Buckingham & Ashley Goodall

Recommended for: Anyone interested in organizational performance

“This book helped me reimagine what it means to be a good leader by debunking common corporate ‘best practice’ myths and providing an alternate path to achieving maximum effectiveness. Highly recommend.”
-Ashly Myers, Vice President, Creative and Strategy

Looking for more marketing inspiration? Check out some of our work.